Evaluation 2019: Paths to the Future of Evaluation: Contribution, Leadership, and Renewal

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Evaluating Social and Economic Challenges in Africa Through Mixed-Method Approaches

Session Number: MME2
Track: Mixed Methods Evaluation
Session Type: TIG Multipaper
Session Chair: Mahua Mandal [Research Associate/Monitoring and Evaluation Specialist - University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill]
Presenter 1: Mahua Mandal [Research Associate/Monitoring and Evaluation Specialist - University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill]
Presenter 2: Noel Blais Verrinder [Senior Associate - Genesis Analytics]
Presenter 3: Elizabeth Gatlin Sutherland [Sr. Advisor- Health Areas, MEASURE Evaluation - Carolina Population Center]
Presentation 1 Additional Author: Lisa Parker, PhD [Senior Technical Advisor - Palladium]
Presentation 1 Additional Author: Abby C Cannon [Gender Specialist - MEASURE Evaluation, Carolina Population Center at the University of North Carolina]
Presentation 2 Additional Author: Ashleigh Robyn Fynn [Analyst - Genesis Analytics]
Presentation 2 Additional Author: Alyna Erin Wyatt, Partner [Partner - Genesis Analytics]
Presentation 3 Additional Author: Abby C Cannon [Gender Specialist - MEASURE Evaluation, Carolina Population Center at the University of North Carolina]
Time: Nov 16, 2019 (09:15 AM - 10:00 AM)
Room: CC 200 F

Abstract 1 Title: Mixing methods in an evaluation of an orphaned vulnerable youth program in Botswana: a recipe for success?
Presentation Abstract 1:

While mixed methods evaluations often refer to simply collecting and analyzing both quantitative and qualitative data, some mixed methods studies use more than one type of qualitative and/or quantitative data to explain whether and how a program or policy “works”.  The USAID-funded MEASURE Evaluation project used this approach to examine the educational, economic, and health effects of a complex, multifaceted orphaned and vulnerable children (OVC) intervention among older adolescents in Botswana.  The evaluation collected and used multiple types of data, including a quantitative household survey, qualitative in-depth interviews, ripple effect mapping groups, and key informant interviews.  This presentation will discuss the benefits and challenges of each type of data collection method, and how they complemented each other to understand whether and how the OVC intervention in Botswana prepares adolescents to be healthy, productive young adults.    


Abstract 2 Title: Let's listen to the tenants - The Impact of Social Housing in South Africa
Presentation Abstract 2:

The South African Social Housing Regulating Authority (“SHRA”) undertook an evaluation of the socio-economic and spatial restructuring impact of social housing towards broad national objectives, specifically, the redress of spatial inequities entrenched by Apartheid. In order to evaluate the contribution of the social housing policy to observed changes to tenants, communities and the sector a mixed methods approach was used. International and national literature, national and provincial statistics on crime, property prices, investment, and employment, a tenant survey of 1 635 leaseholders, focus group discussions with tenants, key informant interviews with the social housing representatives, community leaders and community members from surrounding neighborhoods were all considered. While much research has been done on social housing, this evaluation included the voices of all stakeholders and required the decision makers to listen to those citizens they are trying to support.


Presentation 2 Other Authors: Tshegofatso Kgasago<br />Nomnotho Gumede
Abstract 3 Title: Used of Mixed Methods to Design a Midterm Evaluation of an HIV programs serving Key Populations with HIV services in Ghana
Presentation Abstract 3:

This study was a midterm performance assessment of  project is designed to provide and scale up accessible, high-quality HIV services to Ghana’s key populations (KPs)—men who have sex with men, female sex workers, injecting drug users, and transgender people—and promote transition of service provision to the Government of Ghana. The study used primary and secondary data collection: reviews of program data, client and provider surveys, focus group discussions with service providers, and key informant interviews with stakeholders at the national and local service-delivery levels. It also drew on chart abstraction data for KPs enrolled in case management services, as well as costing data for the service delivery modalities undertaken by the project. This study’s use of mixed methods allowed the performance of the program to be assesses from multiple perspectives and in multiple domains.


Presentation 3 Other Authors: S. Dery, J. Novingnon, S. Foley, B. Iskarpatyoti, K. Torpey
Audience Level: All Audiences

Session Abstract (150 words): 

Evaluating Social and Economic Challenges in Africa Through Mixed-Method Approaches



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Cancellation Policy: Refunds less a $50 fee will be granted for requests received in writing prior to 11:59 PM EDT October 11, 2019. Email cancellation requests to registration@eval.org. All refunds are processed after the meeting. After October 11, 2019 all sales are final. For Evaluation 2019, international attendees and presenters who encounter complications due to the international travel environment will have up to 30 days after the event to request a refund and submit appropriate documentation. No administrative fee will apply for approved international requests.